Key Qualities Of Great Brands

Products are made in the factory, but brands are created in the mind.

– Walter Landor

Everyone’s definition of what a brand is, is slightly different. Ask someone what a brand means to them, and you’ll get a different answer every time. We can all agree, however, that a brand is a lot more than just its colour palette, a logo, and some creative fonts.

The truly good brands understand that the key to branding success lies in getting key factors right. It’s these qualities that distinguish successful brands from poor ones.

Below are five principles to keep in mind when thinking about branding.

Keep Things Simple

When it comes to branding, keeping it simple is important. A complicated brand message only leads to potential misunderstandings about what it is the brand does or what makes it different.

There should be no confusion around how the brand is perceived in the marketplace. Simple doesn’t mean boring as long as it’s memorable, think Netflix.

Focus On Consistency

You want your brand to be memorable, yes, but you also want people to trust it. Having a consistent image and style that you can share with people over time, helps them recognize and place your brand. Trust is built through experiences. Consistently delivering a unified brand experience, assures people of a positive outcome.

 Be Unique

The sum of all the things that separate you from your competitors. It’s not just a brand’s image that makes it unique, but its story as well. How a brand visually expresses, positions, and shares its personality makes up its unique identity. It’s this unique identity that people remember and relate to.

Continuously Build Relationships

Brands that can build relationships with their target audience can keep them coming back. Engaging with customers and analysing any feedback helps you align consumer wants with business goals. 

Focusing on relationship building is a good way to ensure long -term brand success. Good relationships mean loyal customers.

Share Stories

It’s no secret that storytelling is a powerful technique in helping people connect and build relationships. Never has it been truer than today, where most of us live in a fast-paced, digital world.

Stories are something we are hardwired to pay attention to. The secret for brands is to share stories that highlight their value, consumers that share those values will be more motivated to interact with that brand.

When used correctly these branding and marketing principles create the right opportunities for brands to create awareness and grow.

Is your business using social media’s full potential?

At Brieffin we use our expertise to unlock everything social media has to offer your business or personal brand. We use our experience in content creation, strategy and planning, and social media management to help build consistency and deliver marketing success. Let’s talk.

Our Moment of Bliss

Something soulful by Gregory Isakov. More to listen to on our Spotify Playlist.

Social Media Strategy Self Enquiry

“Ones vision is not a road map but a compass.”

– Peter Block

On the surface, building a thriving image with the help of social media looks fairly easy. There are, after all, thousands of examples of personal brands with excellent social media profiles full of great content in every type of niche.

But if you’ve ever tried (for an extended period of time) to run and manage a social media campaign, you would have noticed that to gain the type of following or garner the levels of engagement some successful personal brands do, takes a well thought out strategy and plan.

Without a well-defined roadmap, social media management quickly run into several common problems. Namely; content that doesn’t target their audience, content that varies in its purpose, and publishing content on an inconsistent basis. All this leads to poor results with lots of time, and probably money, invested.

So before diving into content creation, it’s always wise to take a step back and plan your approach. Whichever process you use to create your social media strategy the following points will help you not only define your vision but outline the steps it takes to get there.

What are my online communications goals?

While creating generic goals might be easy, creating specific and measurable goals that you can work towards is something every marketing expert will tell you to do. And they’re right. Document specific goals (and in what time frame) your personal brand would like to achieve them. This will allow you to narrow your focus and push forward with a clear direction. 

Who am I creating content for?

Every product or service has an idea of their ideal customer. By defining exactly who it is you are targeting you can better understand how to align your content with their needs.

You’ll be better able to answer the question, ‘Where will I find my customers and how should I engage with them?’. Having a clear notion of your ideal customer will help you find the right social media platforms suited to your personal brand and audience. Creating the right type of content for the right people is a sure way to get the attention of your target audience.

How will I get my message across?

At this point you have a clear image of who you’re sending your message to, next is deciding on the tone and voice to use in your marketing. Outlining your voice and the tone you use for different audiences and scenarios is what best shares your personality, image, and values.

Create engagement and get valuable feedback by sharing content that speaks to your audience in a format or channel they prefer.

Am I meeting my goals?

When it comes to getting insights into your social media analytics, there is no shortage of different KPIs, metrics, and reporting dashboards to review.

But knowing which ones to focus on, measure, and track is linked to your goals. Review the specific objectives you set yourself at the onset of creating your strategy and use the data that supports those targets.

Knowing when to review your goals or pivot your approach saves you time and money.

It’s important to remember that any social media strategy or content plan usually requires investment at the start. Whether it’s your time or money, the return is worth the resources. In a competitive environment, it could mean the difference between a struggling personal brand and a thriving one.

Knowing how your strategy is performing will help you make informed business decisions.

Are you using social media’s full potential?

At Brieffin we use our expertise to unlock everything social media has to offer your personal brand. We use our experience in content creation, strategy and planning, and social media management to help build consistency and deliver marketing success. Let’s talk.

Our Moment of Bliss


Personal branding is fun! This is why this 2006 “almost classic” song, “Young Folks” by Peter Bjorn and John created the perfect environment for a personal branding inspiration moment. This and more inspiring song moments are waiting on our Spotify playlist.


It’s Time for a Change In Perspective

No problem can be solved from the same level of consciousness that created it.

Albert Einstein

Considering the speed at which our online world changes, it seems like we’re all just doing our best to keep up. By the time we figure out that algorithm, or get our social media strategy in order, it seems like we must pivot to the next big thing. Always chasing, never able to take a deep breath and just exist where we are.

However, there certainly do come times when we feel that our content’s gone a bit stale. Or we’re not seeing the same kind of results from what we’ve been doing in the past. It is finally time for a change. But where to start?

Sometimes, all it takes is a change in perspective. It doesn’t mean you need to overhaul everything you’ve ever done. Maybe make a few tweaks here and there. And rather than looking at it from a “I-have-to-do-this” perspective, look at it as an opportunity for growth. Reframing your mindset in a more positive way can make a big difference.

So when it’s time to change your perspective regarding your marketing or content efforts, here are a few areas to consider.

1. Let your research guide you

In last week’s post, we discussed the power of insight. The analytics about our websites, social media activity, and other content provide use with valuable information that can be used in our favor. This information can help us learn from our past and guide our future. Any additional research you’ve done about your target audience or market trends can help in a similar way. When you make strategy decisions, you can feel confident that they’re backed up by hard, solid facts.

2. Focus on the important things

No matter how much you consider changing, make sure not to let your brand evolve into something you’re not comfortable with. It’s usually a good idea to keep the heart of your brand identity the same – you can always refine it to help it resonate further, but don’t turn it into something totally new. No matter how much your strategy ends up changing, it’s generally best to keep a consistent message to reinforce brand identity and recall for your audience.

3. Have fun along the way

Although you’re using research to back you up, and you’re staying true to the heart of your brand, it’s important to remember to have fun. Not everything goes perfectly the first time, or even the second or third time. Flexibility, agility, and a “roll with the punches” attitude will get you far, whether it’s in revamping your marketing strategy or in different aspects of life. Learn to embrace the unexpected and laugh along the way, and you’re guaranteed to find little moments of bliss.

A change in perspective or an adjustment in mindset. Or even someone to bounce ideas off of. If you’re looking for a partner in your marketing strategy, we’re here. Let’s work together to breathe new life into your brand.

Our Moment of Bliss

“Now you got the whole of the world at your feet.” – Charlie Cunningham (Minimum from Lines)

Join our playlist on Spotify and accept the bright ideas floating around your mind.

A Different Perspective on Brand Personality

Find out who you are and do it on purpose.

Dolly Parton

Many people have heard of the famous Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, also sometimes known as a personality test. When I was in my first year of college – and an “undecided” major – I went to our campus career resource center to do a few tests that could hopefully help to provide me with some clarity. One of these tests was the Myers-Briggs.

While some discount its accuracy – or even usefulness – it’s still the most widely-administered personality test that exists. And whether or not it’s totally accurate, doesn’t actually matter. We’re just going to talk about it in a way that’s fun and could potentially give us something new to think about.

When you take the MBTI, the classic result format is something like INTJ or ESFP. Test-takers are grouped into one of two categories for each of the four “digits.”

First: I (Introversion) or E (Extroversion)

Second: N (Intuition) or S (Sensing)

Third: T (Thinking) or F (Feeling)

Fourth: J (Judging) or P (Perceiving)

Most recently, when I took the test, I was allegedly an ENFJ. But looking at the acronym, even knowing what all of the individual components mean, does that really tell you anything about my personality?

A newer development in the Myers-Briggs world is the website, 16personalities.com. It rounds up each of the 16 possible results into a tangible personality – not just an unhelpful string of letters. Nearly 200 million people have taken the test via this platform.

My result: “The Protagonist.” According to 16personalities, protagonists are “charismatic and inspiring leaders, able to mesmerize their listeners.” My sister is an ENFP – “The Campaigner,” and campaigners are “enthusiastic, creative free spirits, who can always find a reason to smile.”

The website breaks it down into four subgroups with four personality types in each:

Analysts

  • Architect – INTJ
  • Logician – INTP
  • Commander – ENTJ
  • Debater – ENTP

Diplomats

  • Advocate – INFJ
  • Mediator – INFP
  • Protagonist – ENFJ
  • Campaigner – ENFP

Sentinels

  • Logistician – ISTJ
  • Defender – ISFJ
  • Executive – ESTJ
  • Consul – ESFJ

Explorers

  • Virtuoso – ISTP
  • Adventurer – ISFP
  • Entrepreneur – ESTP
  • Entertainer – ESFP

Having a concrete title for each personality type definitely tells you more than just the four letters. You can also dig into more information about each personality type’s strengths, weaknesses, workplace habits, relationships, and more.

Now switching gears… let’s talk about it from a brand perspective.

At Brieffin, we believe that personality is an extremely important part of any brand. It’s the magic dust that brings your brand to life. Finding a way to humanize your brand will make it relate to your customers. They’re looking for connection. “What is your brand personality?” is a great question to ask yourself when evaluating your brand’s humanity.

The idea of these 16 personality types can be a different angle when looking at, or trying to determine, your brand’s personality.

Even with just the brief descriptions of each type, you start to get an idea of who that “person” is. Those who identify as the Logician, for example, are “innovative inventors with an unquenchable thirst for knowledge.” And the Entertainer is someone who is “spontaneous, energetic, and enthusiastic. Life is never boring around them.”

From a consumer perspective, can you think of any brands that fit the above profiles, in your opinion?

As you read all 16 profiles, which ones stand out to you? Which ones resonate with who your brand is, or who you want it to be?

Even if you already feel that you have a strong brand personality, choosing one of the 16 types and reading the additional information may inspire you to look at your traits or messaging from a new perspective.

If you’re not sure, an interesting idea might be to actually take the test, and answer how you think your brand would answer – or how you’d want it to answer. Getting that result back can tell you a lot about how your brand interacts with the world, what your brand values, how your brand processes information, and how it reacts to different situations. These are all definitely human traits, but that’s what we want to do – bring humanity to your brand.

When it comes to the result – whether you distinguish it for yourself, or let the test do the work – it’s important to remember that there is no such thing as a right or wrong type. Just like people, every brand has a unique set of characteristics; strengths and weaknesses, likes and dislikes. The goal here, is not to be boxed in by any results, but to be empowered with the knowledge of seeing your(brand)self from a new angle.

Our Moment of Bliss

“Don’t concern myself with all of the lives I might’ve had.” – K.Flay (I Like Myself (Most Of The Time) from Solutions)

Join our playlist on Spotify and breathe in and out. Namaste.