How to identify customer pain points

“Problems are only opportunities in work clothes.”

Henri Kaiser

Every customer has pain points (or problems) they are experiencing and would like to solve, in some cases, they aren’t even aware of any problems that need solving.

A marketer’s job is three-fold:

Firstly, to identify a customer’s true needs.

Secondly, to then help them realize these needs if they haven’t already become aware of them themselves.

And thirdly, convince them of the best solution to resolve the pain points they are experiencing (hopefully the one you or your business is offering).

Being able to effectively find and resolve customer pain points not only sets you apart from your competitors but also communicates the value you bring. Identifying the root causes of your customer’s pain points may require you to look at potential problem areas from multiple perspectives.

While each pain point is unique, they generally fall into four broad categories of pain points.

Financial pain points: Your client simply wants or needs to reduce their spending on a specific aspect of their business.

Process pain points: Internal business processes need to be improved to increase efficiency.

Productivity pain points: These are barriers to the effective use of time and being more efficient with it.

Support pain points: Identifying wherein a sales or customer journey additional support may be needed to achieve the desired goal.

But how exactly to go about uncovering your customers’ unique issues? The first thing to do is allow them to fully explain their problem and where they believe the roadblocks in their business may be.

Get feedback from sales or customer support teams. Their interactions with existing customers (and lost ones) will shed light on where pain points may lie.

Conduct surveys of existing customers to see how they feel. Viewing an experience from their perspective often shines a spotlight on a problem that was otherwise invisible from a different point of view.

Look to see what your competitors may be doing differently to you. Studying their strategies may expose flaws in yours.

Then there’s Social Media, one of the quickest and most powerful ways to check what’s being said about your products, services, and brand. Studying comments and reviews is an excellent way to identify common pain points customers are experiencing.

Once a pain point has been uncovered, it needs to be solved. And while there is no instant fix formula that can be applied. Each issue that needs to be addressed must first be fully understood, and the solution offered personalized for each customer. Not only does this show you fully understand their needs but you are the right person to trust in solving them.

Is your business using social media’s full potential?

At Brieffin we use our expertise to unlock everything social media has to offer your business or personal brand. We use our experience in content creation, strategy and planning, and social media management to help build consistency and deliver marketing success. Let’s talk.

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Brand vs. Identity: What’s the Difference?

Your brand is what other people say about you when you’re not in the room.

Jeff Bezos

Just as there are so many marketing “buzzwords” floating around when it comes to content – like campaigns, social media, and SEO – there are more when it comes to the essence of your business.

Brand and identity are two words that often seem to be used interchangeably. However, we’ll discuss some key differences between the two that indicate the different purposes they serve.

Brand

Brand is sometimes a “catch-all” term that is used in many different ways. When you think of your favorite logos, you might identify those as brands. But brands are actually much more intangible. A brand is the emotional relationship between a business and its consumers.

In a saturated marketplace, consumers are looking for a reason to connect with one company/product over another – and that’s where the company’s challenge is to set itself apart. One way this frequently happens through a strongly-developed story that resonates with its consumers, thus establishing a unique position in the market.

All of this together creates the essence of a “brand.” Take a look at our highlighted quote above by Amazon Founder Jeff Bezos. A brand is not what you say about yourself – a brand is what your customers say about you.

Now, let’s look at how this compares to identity.

Identity

Identity is also a word that is sometimes used in a variety of ways. But just like brand, it has a specific way it should be applied when discussing a marketing strategy.

Remember what we said about brands – they’re intangible. And here we have the first key difference between brand and identity. Identity is tangible. Identity is something you can see, touch, or hear. Whereas a brand is something you feel.

Since your brand is what others say about you, your identity is everything you do to influence those perceptions. In reality, much of this comes down to design. From colors, fonts, logo, graphics, video, product packaging, web design and more, these are all aspects of identity.

When you take all these distinct elements and create a unifying, coherent image across all fronts, that’s identity. And the identity is used to tell your story – to create that emotional resonance with your consumers.

Brand + Identity

As you can see, brand and identity are two separate but equally important components of any company’s image. Together, they make up a consistent voice that compels consumers to feel connected – through both the tangible and intangible aspects.

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Why Good Website Design is Important

Creativity is a combination of discipline and childlike spirit.

Robert Greene

It’s 2019, and long-gone are the days of the “old” internet. The days when having a website at all was an achievement, rather than an expectation. The days when websites were designed using handwritten – hand-typed? – HTML and CSS codes. The days when the idea of visiting a website via mobile phone was completely unthinkable.

Now, things are totally different. Good web design – including appealing visual design, a strong user interface/user experience design, and responsiveness – is crucial to the success of any company, brand or personal brand, or business. 

But if you’re not convinced, here’s a list of four reasons why good web design is something you’ll want to aim for.

To make a good impression

When your customer visits your website, what is the first thing they’re going to see? Within just a few seconds – maybe without even scrolling – they’re going to make a judgment about your brand. It might not necessarily be a fair assessment, but it’s going to happen. So it’s important to be prepared.

According to a study by Adobe, consumers prefer to look at something that is beautifully-designed, rather than looking at something plain. With an uninspiring designed website, customers may be more likely to leave the page.

To build trust

It’s harder for an audience to want to trust a brand if a website isn’t mindfully done. As we’ve discussed in prior blog posts, most people still seek and crave human connection, even though we’re living in the online world. A clean, well-designed, updated website gives an important insight into the type of brand you are.

Your website can even serve as the first contact when it comes to customer service. It’s important to make your audience feel welcome when visiting you online.

To increase SEO

Search engine optimization – SEO – has become increasingly important over the years. If brands want to capitalize on the search engine algorithms, then it’s essential to create, and index, website content accordingly. Even the little things, like including photos and tagging information in the right way, can make a big difference.

It all comes down to visibility. Web design can be challenging – though it’s a bit more manageable with content management platforms, and good practice of SEO fundamentals are what can really help your website get a step ahead in the search engine algorithm game.

To stay competitive

Even if you’re skeptical about all these other reasons listed above, there’s one more that might make you think twice: good website design is essential if you’re planning to keep your brand or business competitive in your industry. The truth is that your competitors might already be working on designing the latest, greatest website.

With more than 1.5 billion websites online, why should audiences spend any of their time on websites that don’t offer a thoughtful experience? You can probably remember times when you’ve been searching online, and for whatever reason, you didn’t like or trust the website you were on. (Maybe you were on your phone and it wasn’t mobile-friendly.) What did you do? You probably left the page in search of the next website that met your needs. Good web design will keep your audience from doing the same thing to you.

We know web design isn’t easy, especially with the never-ending changes and evolutions in the technological landscape. At Brieffin, our digital marketing focus has led us to a wealth of experiences in the web design space. We are proud of the websites we’ve created in cooperation with our clients over the past years.

If you’re looking for a partner to help you achieve your website design goals, we’d love to chat with you – so reach out to us!

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The Value of Simplicity

Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.

Leonardo da Vinci

As children, one of the first things we learn is the concept of opposites. Yes and No. Up and Down. Young and Old. Short and Tall. Easy and Difficult. Soft and Hard. Simple and… Complex.

In the technology age, we tend to think complex is better. Last week, the newest models for the iPhone were announced – the iPhone 11 and iPhone 11 Pro. One of them has THREE cameras. And even though the phones aren’t officially launched for a few more days, and even though the vast majority of us have 1-2 year-old phones that work perfectly fine, the pre-orders for the new models are rolling in.

Why? Is it really because we feel a deep need in our souls for our phones to have three cameras? For a few people, maybe. But for many others, it’s more about having the latest and greatest. It’s about saving ourselves from possible FOMO (Fear Of Missing Out). It could even be about the perceived status associated with having such a fancy, complicated technological gadget. The answers might be different for everyone.

In some ways, it might be logical to come to the conclusion that complex is better than simple. Think back to your first mobile phone. If it was like mine, it could only make basic phone calls. Now, each of us is the owner of a tiny, powerful computer that fits in our back pocket. And it may or may not have THREE cameras. It seems like everything is trending toward complexity.

However, simplicity and complexity don’t necessarily need to be opposites – at least, I don’t think we need to pick one or the other.

Think about the reason why certain complexities exist: it’s because we want life to be simpler for ourselves. The complexity exists because we want to do less work – making our own jobs simpler. The iPhone 11 Pro has three cameras because we want to have professional-quality photos without becoming professional photographers.

It’s worth bearing in mind: Simple doesn’t always mean basic, and complex doesn’t always mean advanced.

When thinking about consumers, studies have shown that people actually want simplicity. There’s a lot of value in simplifying your messaging, especially as the online space becomes more crowded with more competing voices.

According to research  by design consultancy firm Siegel+Gale in their 2017 Global Brand Simplicity Index, “brands that embrace simplicity tend to enjoy increased revenue, brand advocacy and engagement.”

They found that 64% of consumers would pay more for a simple experience, while 61% would recommend a brand which has a clear proposition that saves them time.

“Simplicity, in these terms, refers to the entire customer experience and can mean anything from providing concise product information, intuitive website navigation or a quick and easy transaction process.” (Medium)

It’s not about offering less, but making what’s offered more accessible, more intuitive, and more user-friendly. So, when it comes to your brand – regardless of your industry – how are you able to accomplish these directives?

Consider these topics when simplifying your brand:

1. Visual identity

Take stock of all your visual communication assets. What fonts, colors, shapes, icons, textures, logos are you using? Then ask yourself whether they’re all truly necessary. By identifying the assets that truly represent your brand the best, you can increase harmony and decrease the disconnect.

2. Portfolio/services

Have you ever heard the phrase, “Jack of all trades, master of none”? It basically means someone who knows something about a lot of different topics but isn’t an expert at any of them. Another opportunity for simplification in a business is in portfolio/services. Maybe your brand has evolved from where it was when you first started, or maybe you now focus on a specific product offering. By discarding the extras, you’re able to streamline your brand and attract customers who know exactly what they can expect from you.

3. Content/campaign strategy

While it might be tempting to throw ideas against the wall and see what sticks, it’s not your best bet for brand simplification. Instead of trying to cater different campaigns or strategies to different audiences, focus your approach and concentrate on your strongest option. The same goes for your brand’s values, attributes, personality, and other features. Decide on the essentials and focus on those – think not about everything you could do, but what you should do that fits with your desired brand image.

Simplicity has become increasingly desirable in our oversaturated digital world, but it’s perfectly achievable along with a bit of hard work. By taking inventory of your brand image, you can identify the essentials and streamline your identity to simplify. Your customers will thank you.

As always, we at Brieffin are here to help if you need any assistance in the brand-identity-designing process. Just reach out to us, and we’d love to partner with you to achieve your brand goals.

Our Moment of Bliss

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